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Mobilism MARcamp Session

Page history last edited by PBworks 17 years ago

Session: Mobilism

Session Leader: Erik Adigard

Session Contact: Subash Mandanapu, Orange R&D

Presentation Mobilism

 

Session Participants:

- Erik Adigard

- Marc Dangeard

- Steven Hessel, Hessel Technology Consulting

- Ben Dempster, Frog Design

- Subash Mandanapu, Orange R&D

- Michael Smith, Orange R&D

- Mark Plakias, Orange R&D

- Srinivas Chervirala, Orange R&D

 

 

Notes:

MOBILISM = (Mobile media + Mobilization) x Momentum

- Presentation based on The Culture of Engagement exhibit - a graphical expression of the state of the world. Displays of 400+ designs produced as ceramic tiles or flyers. (See Appendix)

- Media will always change and eventually mutate to the society that produced it.

- The user does not want to avoid controversy; advertising must address the global picture.

- Brands have always tried to influence the customer, but customers are more connected to global issues. A brand that connects to the user through global issues will succeed. Examples include: Nike, Wal-Mart and Denny’s.

- Graffiti, either corporate or consumer, is an expression of global issues through advertising. Users will seek an outlet to express this through mobile media.

- Brands can serve to break the language barrier. Pictograms, especially U.S. logos, are understood worldwide.

- Users are interested in media expressions that are usable and appropriate to the mobile platform.

-All aspects of daily life are being integrated in the mobile device (see Interesting Cell Phone Statistics below)

 

Questions:

- What does this mean for advertising – Is this moving towards interaction through brands?

- Can brands can be used to engage the audience?

- Does engagement always imply interaction?

- How does language serve to promote or deter advertising?

- Is it better to trigger interference between brands and consumers, or wait for the interference through some global issue?

 

Interesting Cell Phone Statistics:

~ more than 2 billion people from all around the world are cell phone users

~ about 75% of teenagers in the United States alone have a cell phone

~ more than 50% of teenagers prioritize their cell phones over TV viewing

~ American teenage cell phone users spend more than $150 billion a year

~ by 2006, 50M Americans will use their cell phone to authorize payment for goods

~ cell phones can survive under water for ($500)

~ cell phones can be used as guns (for $800)

~ a high-pitched ring tone can be heard by teenagers but not by most adults

~ The average user replaces his or her cell phone every 18 months

~ cell phones are blamed for 20-30% of automobile accidents

 

 

Appendix:

THE CULTURE OF ENGAGEMENT exhibit

conceived & designed by Erik Adigard/M-A-D for

Catalysts! the cultural force of communication design

(lead curator: Max Bruinsma)

Experimentadesign2005: the Lisbon Biennale

http://madxs.com/mobilism/

 

INSPIRATION: “mobilism” is the shared impetus of people, communication tools, and ideas.

•• Mobilism is media of the masses—the totality of graffiti, demonstration signs, t-shirts, bumper stickers, blogs and digital files disseminated through the internet and mobile phones.

•• Mobilism repositions personal opinions as a new universal currency: a million signals in accord or in conflict that can quickly become a media tidal wave. Most notably, it reconfigures usage of languages, communication techniques, and design into a new pervasive culture.

INSTALLATION: 100 designers from five continents were invited to send graphical expressions of their views on the state of the world. The 400+ designs were produced as ceramic tiles or flyers. A printer, high on the wall, continually spits out selected flyers that litter the exhibit floor—they can be taken away by visitors.

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